REDISTRIBUTION

Continue to enjoy yesterday's post for a bit longer. If you need new reading material, check out this (very) long New Yorker piece on the "reform" of the Newark public school system. I used to think that the education reform industry was a domestic version of the NGO/Foreign Aid industry – that is, a massive conveyor belt for transferring billions of dollars from "foundations" to "consultants" with the occasional nickel trickling down to the plebes the system purports to be helping. Then I saw Waiting for Superman and I became more convinced. Then I read this article and I'm comfortable stating it as a fact in the future.

It's all there – the colonialism, the paternalism, and the cloying sense that what These People really need is a good dose of white upper-middle class values and the free market is the best way to deliver them.

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9 Responses to “REDISTRIBUTION”

  1. Middle Seaman Says:

    A strong connection exists between NGOs and the top echelons of the liberal belief. Elitism, arrogance, interest in "high" policy (NSA) and foreign affairs play a major roles. Otherwise put, disregard for blue color workers (workers period), dismissal of everyday problems, etc.

    The Left is dead and is now called liberals or NGOs. RIP.

  2. Andrew C Says:

    It depressed me how much of the focus of the whole shebang was on trying to undermine the conditions of the teachers. And Cory Booker is another corporatist black guy who started off doing community organisation but as moved as quickly as he could to smooching with Wall St.

    He better get the long-form birth certificate ready now.

  3. c u n d gulag Says:

    The "Privatization" of any government function, is an plan to move pubic tax dollars into the pockets and offshore accounts of the politicians wealthy cronies.

    And the politicians then have a "feather bed" to land on, whenever they decide to quit politics, or the voters have had enough of their act.

    We need to "Un-privatize," not "Privatize" more.

  4. Benny Lava Says:

    I refuse to watch waiting for Superman because it is apparently just another op ed that what this country really needs is better teachers. Despite the fact that the most important factor in whether you child will go to college is – surprise – the parents. Instead we are creating this blame the teacher fallacy. From no child left behind, aka fire the teachers, to race to the top, aka fire the teachers. We created this culture where parents absolve themselves of all responsibility for their children's education. It is sad, really.

  5. Tim H. Says:

    And let's not think too much about the time parents no longer have to spend with their children, their employers will be ashamed to show their selves at the country club without that next billion…

  6. cat Says:

    Please send me an invite to the Revolution's Facebook group.

  7. BigHank53 Says:

    If you need another reason to drink, look up a couple stories about the attempt by the Board of Visitors (the trustees) of the University of Virginia to force out the university president. The BoV though UVA should be following in the pioneering path blazed by the University of Phoenix…as long as their consultant friends stood to make millions off the deal, anyway. None of that in-house shit.

  8. democommie Says:

    "A strong connection exists between NGOs and the top echelons of the liberal belief. Elitism, arrogance, interest in "high" policy (NSA) and foreign affairs play a major roles. Otherwise put, disregard for blue color workers (workers period), dismissal of everyday problems, etc."

    You're full of shit, but other than that, spot on.

  9. E* Says:

    @c u: I will gladly live in any country that collects pubic tax dollars.

    Now that we've established my level of maturity, I want to point out that I am on the receiving end of the dollar transfer, as I work at a "non-profit" education consulting firm. Of course, by the time all of the various VPs (and we have A LOT of VPs) and managers skim the good bits off the top, there is hardly a trickle of those billions left for those of us actually doing the consulting work. It's quite the racket.

    My job consists of going around and collecting "data" about how to improve various aspects of various education systems. My invariable conclusion is that whoever has hired us should stop paying ridiculous sums to us and funnel that money instead to the people doing the actual work (i.e., teachers). But I could never actually write that in a report, could I? Because it would never get past the various VPs and managers who read the reports before they go out to make sure we're staying on message…